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Which sport is right for me?

Individual sports

People who engage in an individual sport can train alone or in a group. You play a greater role in your success than you would as part of a team.

Summary

If you engage in an individual sport, you can train whenever, wherever and however you like. Alternatively, you can join a club or a group for scheduled training sessions. This also gives people with and without disabilities the option to train together in many different sports. In general, you can be much more flexible about training than is the case with team sports. However, this also means you’re more personally responsible for the way you train and for staying motivated.

Types of sports

Athletics

Many athletics events have been adapted and use approved devices so people with different types of disabilities can participate. Athletics events differentiate between those held on the track (e.g., 100-m sprint), those held on the road (e.g., marathon) and those held on the field (e.g., long jump, shot put). In order to compare performances more fairly, athletes are divided into disability categories when competing. Many sports clubs offer inclusive athletics training for people with and without disabilities.

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Tennis

Tennis is a fascinating sport for people of any age and gender. You can play outdoors or indoors, in singles, doubles or mixed matches – and with or without a wheelchair. Tennis is fun and soon gives you a sense of achievement; it also helps you become more coordinated and flexible.

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Table tennis

Table tennis is an extremely dynamic sport that can be played by people with a wide range of disabilities. Conventional table tennis rules apply, but minor exceptions are made with regard to wheelchairs and leaning on the table. As a result, top players who use wheelchairs not only train with players who are on foot but can truly compete with them in classic table tennis contests. Beginners and amateurs can use a standard, everyday wheelchair. If a player has an impaired grip (e.g., tetraplegia), the table tennis bat can be fixed to the hand.

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Archery

Draw the bow, aim at the target, focus on the bull’s eye – and fire the arrow. It might look perfectly simple at first glance, but success requires a great deal of perseverance, practice and mental training. Wheelchair users and athletes without disabilities stand equal chances of success, so they can train and compete as equals without changing the rules. Inexpensive and easily manageable bows are available for beginners. Archery clubs and rifle clubs offer introductory courses, and you can train indoors, outdoors, alone or in a group.

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Sports products

Whether you’re a newcomer, amateur or Paralympic gold medal winner – our Sportsline products aim to make you faster, happier and more agile.

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